CAB - 7 Oct 2020 - 10 Oct 2020 - Advice

Community / Cullivoe marina and business park project in line for £1.3m funding boost

The existing Cullivoe marina. Photo © Mike Pennington (cc-by-sa/2.0)

A PROJECT which could see a new community-owned marina built in Cullivoe and the area’s industrial estate expanded is in line to receive over £1.3 million in funding.

The project, led by North Yell Development Council, has been recommended for a grant from the Scottish Government’s Regeneration Capital Grant Fund.

Around £1.27 million would be provided in 2020/21 and £49,924 would follow in 2021/22.

The fund’s latest pay-outs are subject to the draft Scottish budget being agreed in parliament.

North Yell Development Council director Andrew Nisbet said he was “quite delighted” by the prospect of the funding.

He added that the project is also seeking some funding from Shetland Islands Council, while the development council will also use some of its own money.

The new marina in Cullivoe would offer over 30 berths, and it would located just south to the current community marina at Cullivoe pier, which has a long-standing waiting list due to its 14-berth size.

The proposed extension to the industrial estate wold see the business park more than double in size.

It would also see five caravan pitches and a toilet block installed.

The project, however, has stalled in recent times due to the poor condition of the Gutcher to Cullivoe.

The development council were told that the road would suffer from the extra traffic involved during construction and the project essentially stalled as the SIC ruled that the work would only go ahead if the road was upgraded.

Directors sought to counter this, however, by seeking to vary the planning consent to allow materials to be transported to the site by sea.

Planners have yet to come to the decision over the variation.

The road in question was recently identified by Shetland Islands Council as a priority for upgrade, but it is thought that it could take a number of years for it to come to fruition.

“It would be a major problem for us if we didn’t get the go-ahead from planning,” Nisbet said.