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Brexit discussion at museum

| Written by Shetland News

Professor Michael Keating of Aberdeen University: 'Brexit will have a particular effect in Scotland.' Professor Michael Keating of Aberdeen University: 'Brexit will have a particular effect in Scotland.' SHETLAND Museum and Archives will next week play host to an evening's discussion on the implications of Brexit for Shetland, Scotland and the UK.

The event is one in a series taking place across Scotland organised by  academic research institute the Centre on Constitutional Change.

The centre's director, Professor Michael Keating of Aberdeen University, will be joined by Jim Nicolson of the National Farmers' Union of Scotland and Shetland Fishermen's Association chief officer Simon Collins. 

Brexit: What now for the UK and Scotland? will take place at 6.30pm on Thursday 16 February.

Prof Keating said: "We want to get around the country, listening to people on Brexit and finding out what their concerns are – but not just in the cities, we want to hear what different communities have to say."

He continued saying that he hoped the evening would provide an opportunity to discuss the impact of leaving the Single Market and perceived implications on Scotland and Shetland.

"What is the impact on European funds? What might happen to fisheries policy, what might happen to agriculture policy and what might happen to the funds that come with them?" he asked.

The event will take place against the backdrop of a growing dispute between the Scottish and UK governments.

"Brexit will have a particular effect in Scotland as the UK voted to leave the EU and Scotland voted to remain," he said.

"The two governments have different views on membership of the Single Market and the Scottish government is now talking about holding a second independence referendum."

The evening will have a particular focus on the impact of Brexit on agriculture and fisheries, two areas that are currently greatly influenced by the UK's membership of the EU.

"The CFP has been very unpopular in Shetland," explained Prof Keating, "but, on the other hand, there's now a question about where we market our fish after Brexit – about the loss of European markets."

The evening, which does not require a ticket, will involve presentations from the three speakers followed by questions from the audience.

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